ADOPTION FAQs

 

Do you adopt Great Danes to families with small and/or young children?

Yes. We believe in matching each of our rescued Great Danes with the most appropriate adopter regardless of family composition through a process which includes extensive screening, as well as continued follow-up contact after Adoption. This is not to say that all rescue Great Danes are suitable for children however, we do believe that more often than not that we will be able to match you with a well-matched Dane for your family, lifestyle and environment.

Do you adopt Great Danes to families without a fenced in yard?

Yes. We believe in matching each of our rescued Great Danes with the most appropriate adopter regardless of their living environment through a process which includes extensive screening, as well as continued follow-up contact after Adoption. This is not to say that all rescue Great Danes are suitable for families without fenced backyards however, we do believe that more often than not that we will be able to match you with a well-matched Dane for your family, lifestyle and environment and that a daily commitment to on and off-leash exercise in a safe environment is what is most important.

What treatments do your Great Danes receive prior to adoption?

Our rescue Great Danes (if not already) are spayed/neutered while in foster care depending on age. They each receive a DA2PPL (Distemper virus, Adenovirus (type 2), Parvovirus, Parainfluenza, and Leptosporosis) vaccination along with a 1 year Rabies vaccination. They are dewormed against various parasites and receive heartworm testing. Along with preventative treatment as described above, any Danes in our care that present with serious medical issues will be diagnosed and/or treated when warranted.

Why do most of your Great Danes come into your care?

Most of the Great Danes that come into our care are from owner surrenders. This may be due to a number of life events such as change in family composition, environment, career change and working hours and/or finances. Any of the above changes can also present changes in not only the families but their Danes lifestyle and behavior resultant from the now lack the exercise and consistency of routine that they require to thrive.